Vegetables

All things vegetables
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Broccoli

Broccoli is an edible green plant in the cabbage family whose large flowering head is eaten as a vegetable.

The word broccoli comes from the Italian plural of broccolo, which means "the flowering crest of a cabbage", and is the diminutive form of brocco, meaning "small nail" or "sprout". Broccoli is often boiled or steamed but may be eaten raw.

Suitable to grow as sprouts in water based with medium or without. May also be grown in soil.


Chia

Chia is mostly identified as Salvia hispanica L. or Salvia columbariae Benth. Today, chia is grown and consumed commercially in its native Mexico and Guatemala, as well as Bolivia, Argentina, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Australia, and the southwestern United States. New patented varieties of chia have been bred in Kentucky for cultivation in northern latitudes of the United States.

Chia is grown commercially for its seed, a food rich in omega-3 fatty acids since the seeds yield 25–30% extractable oil, including α-linolenic acid.

Suitable to grow as sprouts in water based with medium or without. May also be grown in soil.


 

Kale

Kale or leaf cabbage are certain cultivars of cabbage (Brassica oleracea) grown for their edible leaves. A kale plant has green or purple leaves and the central leaves do not form a head (as with headed cabbages). Kales are considered to be closer to wild cabbage than most domesticated forms of Brassica oleracea.

Raw kale is composed of 84% water, 9% carbohydrates, 4% protein, and 1% fat. In a 100 gram serving, raw kale provides 49 calories. Like collards, it contains a large amount of vitamin K: several times the Daily Value (DV). It is a rich source (20% or more of the DV) of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin B6, folate, and manganese. Kale is a good source (10–19% DV) of thiamin, riboflavin, pantothenic acid, vitamin E and several dietary minerals, including iron, calcium, potassium, and phosphorus.

Suitable to be grown as sprouts in water based with medium or without. May also be grown in soil.


Mizuna

Mizuna is a cultivated crop plant from the species Brassica juncea var. japonica a dark green, serrated leafed plant.

'Mizuna' has been cultivated in Japan since ancient times.

Its' taste has been described as a "piquant, mild peppery flavor...slightly spicy, but less so than arugula (also known as Summer Rocket). It is also used in stir-fries, soups, and Japanese hot pots.

Suitable to be grown as sprouts in water based with medium or without. May also be grown in soil.



Mustard

Mustard seeds are the small round seeds of various mustard plants. The seeds are usually about 1 to 2 millimetres (0.039 to 0.079 in) in diameter and may be colored from yellowish white to black. They are an important spice in many regional foods and may come from one of three different plants: black mustard (Brassica nigra), brown Indian mustard (B. juncea), or white mustard (B. hirta/Sinapis alba).

Grinding and mixing the seeds with water, vinegar or other liquids creates the yellow condiment known as prepared mustard.


Pak Choi

This member of the cabbage family has a number of different names, including bok choy, horse's ear, Chinese celery cabbage and white mustard cabbage. Its structure looks like a squat celery, with either white or very pale green short, chunky stalks and glossy, deep green leaves.

The texture of both leaves and stalks is crisp, and the flavour is somewhere between mild cabbage and spinach. If very young it can be eaten raw in salads, but is best when briefly cooked.

Suitable to grow as sprouts in water based with medium or without. May also be grown in soil.


Radish

The radish (Raphanus raphanistrum subsp. sativus) is an edible root vegetable of the Brassicaceae family that was domesticated in Europe in pre-Roman times. Radishes are grown and consumed throughout the world, being mostly eaten raw as a crunchy salad vegetable. They have numerous varieties, varying in size, flavor, color, and length of time they take to mature. Radishes owe their sharp flavor to the various chemical compounds produced by the plants, including glucosinolate, myrosinase, and isothiocyanate.

They are sometimes grown as companion plants and suffer from few pests and diseases. They germinate quickly and grow rapidly, smaller varieties being ready for consumption within a month, while larger daikon varieties take several months. Another use of radish is as cover or catch crop in winter or as a forage crop. Some radishes are grown for their seeds; daikon, for instance, may be grown for oil production. Others are used for sprouting.

Suitable to be grown as sprouts in water based with medium or without. May also be grown in soil.

 

Summer Rocket

Arugula or rocket (Eruca sativa; syns. E. vesicaria subsp. sativa (Miller) Thell., Brassica eruca L.) is an edible annual plant in the Brassicaceae family used as a leaf vegetable for its fresh peppery flavor. Other common names include garden rocket, or simply rocket (British, Australian, South African, Irish and New Zealand English), and eruca. Some additional names are "rocket salad", "rucola", "rucoli", "rugula", "colewort", and "roquette". Eruca sativa, which is widely popular as a salad vegetable, is a species of Eruca native to the Mediterranean region, from Morocco and Portugal in the west to Syria, Lebanon, and Turkey in the east.

Suitable to be grown as sprouts in water based with medium or without. May also be grown in soil.


Sweet Basil

Basil  Ocimum basilicum) is also called great basil or Saint-Joseph's-wort, is a culinary herb of the family Lamiaceae (mints).

Basil is native to tropical regions from central Africa to Southeast Asia.  It is a tender plant, and is used in cuisines worldwide. Depending on the species and cultivar, the leaves may taste somewhat like anise, with a strong, pungent, often sweet smell.

Suitable to be grown as sprouts in water based with medium or without. May also be grown in soil.


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